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  • kwthom
    replied
    I know...old post...

    Originally posted by HBarlow View Post
    I would prefer a loop from Las Cruces to Albuquerque to Flagstaff to Tucson. Parts of that route are very scenic and a pleasure to ride but it's too early in the year to ride I-40. I could encounter a heavy snow storm and be stranded in Flagstaff for a week.
    The Motorcycle Touring Forum (MTF), an unofficial adjunct society of other long distance riders does this very loop...I think they've done it twice since I rode with them back in 2011 when I certified a ride for the first time. There is a shortcut (NM-26, from Hatch to Deming) which is how the loop is run when it starts & ends in Tucson.

    Leave a comment:


  • HBarlow
    replied
    Ken,

    Thank you for all the good information you've offered. I initially considered but rejected several possible Texas routes.

    I live in a rural area along US-82 which is a divided four lane and busy artery connecting DFW and Lubbock with a 75 mph speed limit. When I'm forced to travel to Lubbock during daylight hours I set my cruise at 75+ mph and slow only for the small towns. Before daylight and after sunset is a different story. Lot's of suicidal critters roaming.

    We also own a home in Lubbock where my (working) wife lives during the week. I could start and end a loop at Lubbock including Amarillo which is connected by I-27 but except for north, all other highways connecting Lubbock are non-interstate and include small towns and wildlife. I don't want to deal with either.

    I want to make my first attempt at an IBA ride as simple and easy as possible. To me that includes interstate highway only, as far south as I can be, no small towns, and no critters. Those parameters lead me to I-10 and I-8 in NM and AZ.

    I would prefer a loop from Las Cruces to Albuquerque to Flagstaff to Tucson. Parts of that route are very scenic and a pleasure to ride but it's too early in the year to ride I-40. I could encounter a heavy snow storm and be stranded in Flagstaff for a week.

    My route will be Las Cruces to Yuma and return. That will keep me on I-8/10 where the weather should be warm and clear, speed limit is a continuous 75 mph except through Tucson, and four-legged critters don't usually live in the desert southwest.

    Rural west Texas highways are simply too dangerous for me during hours of darkness. I see the highway roadkill every day. Early every morning TXDOT trucks leave the Crosby County and Dickens County district offices to travel the length of highways in their districts to remove roadkill carcasses. The threat is real!

    If I have to abort my ride along I-8 or I-10 I'll just have to tough it out to the next town with a Motel 6. I hope that doesn't happen but if it does I'll deal with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • kwthom
    replied
    I'm playing with maps...

    If you're not planning an out-and-back type of ride, this seems to be what you're considering - or something close to it:

    https://goo.gl/maps/XvXJF

    I've added the ~2.5% additional taking you down to San Luis, AZ. There's not much gas at all if you cross into California, but there is in the border town of San Luis.

    The routing from "Crosby County TX" is as Google plotted it - but you know your local region better than I do, you can adjust the start point - or from there to Big Spring, but don't make it too complex. IBA always assumes the shortest route between two points, unless you prove otherwise.


    I'm a fan of loops...if you want to bail out in the middle of the ride, you can cut off the loop and head straight home.

    So, a bit more playing...again, conceptual rides only...

    https://goo.gl/maps/PIOir

    2/3'rds of the route is interstate highway, much of the rest is a combination of two-lane highways and Farm-to-Market/Ranch roads.

    If it was me, I'd almost ride this loop counter-clockwise - same most of the freeway stuff for daylight.

    Leave a comment:


  • kwthom
    commented on 's reply
    If I may inject another bit of thought...you're contemplating '...a 700 mile day, a rest, then another 300+ to finish."

    If your typical 700 mile day takes 12 hours, that's an average - including not moving time - of ~58MPH. If you were to consider continuing to maintain that ~58MPH overall average speed, that takes you just a bit over 17 hours to do a full 1000+ mile ride.

    If you think you can rest adequately in less than 7 hours, in order to be sure you 'beat the clock' and have the 1000+ miles in before that 24 hour clock expires, then that's the way to plan it.

    Consider planning both ways - one straight thru (see my earlier PM) and one as described above then ask yourself which one makes the most sense from a time management perspective. That's all endurance riding is quite simply...time management.

  • HBarlow
    commented on 's reply
    That's all helpful.

    I'm playing with google maps to select a route so it should produce the same mileage as the IBA verifier staff's methods.

    I do have a Garmin on my wing as well as the built-in navigation unit so there should be no issue of ending up a little short on distance traveled.

    I want to do the ride on interstate highways so I won't do it to and from home. Also, the deer population is too large across most of Texas to risk riding before sunrise and after sundown.

  • HBarlow
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks. Every personal testimony I read encourages me a little more.

  • kwthom
    replied
    Originally posted by HBarlow View Post
    <...>I've persuaded myself I want to try it. I first laid out a several potential routes across Texas. I considered Shreveport, LA to Willcox, AZ or Jackson, MS to Las Cruces. I also considered DFW to El Paso and return. West Texas - from Odessa to El Paso is simply barren and boring. The 80 mph speed limit is a plus and usually light traffic is good but it would be boring.

    <...>

    I would appreciate everyone's comments, suggestions, recommendations, and sound advice.
    You've already gotten some good advice; here's my two-bits worth.

    1 Make your route as simple as possible. An out-and-back ride can be done - and you can sleep in your own bed - in 18-20 hours if you loaf around. If you're efficientat every stop, you should be able to accomplish the ride in 16 to 18 hours. Seriously. Plot about 520 miles or so; look for a good fuel/food stop as close as you can. You'd only need three receipts if you do it this way - beginning, turn-around, end. Get two receipts (gas pump & inside store) at each location if you're paranoid.

    1a If you don't use a GPS on your bike, these are the types of rides that make having a GPS worth their weight in gold.

    1b DON"T believe your bike's odometer! I've measured mine; 2.5% error. IronButt Association uses GPS/Google miles not the miles you claim. Make sure your ride is at LEAST 2% longer (some say 3%) to make darn sure the ride really is the mileage you claim.

    2 You need a witness at the beginning and at the end of the ride that basically proves your odometer readings at the beginning and end of the ride are legitimate. I'll point you to my posts in this thread started here on the topic:
    http://www.theglforum.com/social-groups/darksiders/iron-butt/8718-long-distance-ss1000-bbg-etc-discussion-planning-etc

    3 This is a long ride, but it's just a ride. Don't feel well, didn't get off to a good start, don't feel well enough to finish SAFELY? Abort the ride, learn from it & ride it again another time.

    Don't sweat it - watch the weather...fina good window, and go! I did my last ride on 30 December - a few hours of right-close-to-freezing, but the rest of the day was fantastic!

    Leave a comment:


  • kwthom
    commented on 's reply
    April...maybe as late as early May. If possible, plan a departure time that puts you in the area in the afternoon to be certain.

  • networkguy3
    replied
    I am hardly qualified to comment here, as I have not even been certified yet as an IBA guy. I did a 1200 mile ride in about 20 hours last spring, but I decided that I wanted my first certified SS1000 to be an in-state 2 lane ride which I plan to do this spring so I have not sent in the documentation for that ride.

    I did stop riding in 1984 and did not start again until 2013. When I rode in the '80s, I was not a long distance rider as I could not afford to. The longest ride I ever did was about 1500 miles in about 40 hours with 55 mph speed limits on a GS850G Suzuki. 8 months after swinging my leg over a GoldWing for the first time, and with only about 5000 miles under my belt on the Wing, I did the 1000 miles in < 24 hours. I am not saying that it was trivial, but I am saying that it was not difficult. The ride was about 90% Interstate and did not have to hurry to complete the ride. The weather was pretty good except for some low temperatures at the beginning of the ride and some pretty severe crosswinds in the middle of the afternoon. The only struggle I had was at about 9 hours into the ride when I got REALLY tired. I realized that I was not eating or drinking enough to stay alert. I wear a full-face helmet so eating and drinking on the move is not trivial, but I had some nut bars in the passenger cubby and and I increased the amount of Gatorade that I was drinking from my Camelback and I was OK for the rest of the ride. BTW: I did discover that trying to eat chocolate covered snack bars that have been in the passenger cubby for 6 hours when it is almost 80 degrees is not a good idea. The nut bars worked OK, but the chocolate covered protein bars were a MESS. I have a 90 degree bite valve on the CamelBak and that worked OK even under my helmet.

    The only reason for this tale is to say that the SS1000 is very doable. You do not have to hurry, just keep at it. I am diabetic and have peripheral neuropathy (nerve pain) in my feet but that does not bother me more when I ride than it does when I'm sitting in an office chair. I have a stock seat on the bike and do not have highway pegs. In fact, I did not have my mirror wings installed. I wore my normal riding gear which consists of jeans, T-shirt, riding jacket, riding pants, helmet, gloves and boots. I wore my Gerbings jacket liner and gloves for the couple of hours that the temperature was under 50 degrees. I do not have LDC underwear and I would confess that for the warmest part of the ride, which was over 80 degrees, my butt did get a little uncomfortable. I did stretch my legs every 15 - 20 minutes by holding them in front of me for a minute or so. I also stood on my pegs a few times during the ride just for variety.

    Leave a comment:


  • HBarlow
    commented on 's reply
    Harvey also,

    That's good information. I guess I can't know about my endurance until I try it. I'm certainly not an athlete and don't climb mountains or hike 10 miles in the wilderness but I walk a lot, am slender, eat decently, don't smoke or drink alcohol, and my heart is in good shape.

    I don't think I'm stupid enough to force myself to push on beyond my abilities. There's usually a motel along the interstate where I could take a nap if it becomes necessary.

  • harvey
    replied
    Harvey,

    I am not sure if the IB Association still offers it but at one time there was a special SS1000 if you did it all in one state. I thought this was a great idea and laid out a route in VA. Over half of the route was on two lane roads with a max speed limit of 55MPH. Now remember that VA is much smaller than TX so you had to cover a large part of the state to complete the 1000 miles. Anyway it was a fun ride and I got to see a lot of my home state. Even the part after dark was enjoyable.

    As far as gas tickets, I really have not had one that just printed a blank sheet, but I have had them not print at all and this is going back many years of using Pay at the Pump. Go in the facility and get a ticket from the clerk and if data is missing write it down and have the clerk sign it along with you and date and time.

    I do urge you to make sure you are physically ready for a long day in the saddle. A 600 mile day is one thing but stretching that to a 1000 miles really requires a lot more energy and better condition. Exercise and there are recommended exercises somewhere does help. So does practice and building up to the ride.

    You know about hydration, I carry a camelback with about 2 liters of water. I fill it and add ice as the day progresses. Avoid energy drinks, sugary drinks, sodas, and caffeine.

    This type of ride can be fun but know yourself well enough to know that it is time to quit before you crash. Sometimes we push on when we should have quit. I have also found that when doing a 1000 mile ride it works better for me not to stop for a few hours sleep---takes too much time and I don't want to get up and go. It is easier for me to just keep going, then I do the few hours sleep and then try to stay up till bedtime and readjust to my normal sleep habits. I like my 7-8 hours!

    Leave a comment:


  • HBarlow
    commented on 's reply
    That's encouraging.

    Thanks for the offer. Right now I don't have any questions that need to be answered.

    I've found that simply reading . . . and rereading . . . all the back issues of the Iron Butt magazine, guidance copied from the IBA's website, and random posts by IBA members on various motorcycle websites provides just about everything I need to know.

  • ssncob
    replied
    Grampawinger and I do many IBA rides - he's 75. We've got a few more planned for this year. Go with a positive attitude - you can do it. PM me if want to talk.

    Leave a comment:


  • HBarlow
    replied
    For those who live in AZ and NM - I know I can usually ride across I-10 nearly year round but what's the earliest time of year when I can plan to ride from ABQ to Flagstaff on I-40 without risk of a winter storm making life miserable. Flagstaff is about 7,000' iirc. I have good Aerostich gear including a heated vest and can ride all day pretty comfortably down to around 30° but don't want to risk ice or snow.

    Leave a comment:


  • HBarlow
    commented on 's reply
    Good. Thanks. I'm at the worry stage as I begin planning this ride.
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