You Never Know...

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  • You Never Know...

    ... when you'll pick up one of these. I have no idea where this 3 inch deck nail came from or how long it was in my tire... at least a couple of days I'm guessing. Thankfully I'm in the habit of checking tires every morning.

    I don't put a gauge on my tires every morning, but I bounce on the bike and take a hard look. Idk about other tires but the OEM Stones have enough flex in the sidewalls that an abnormally low pressure is pretty obvious to spot if you know what the tire is supposed to look like with full pressure.

    I would go as far to suggest that you should even experiment a bit. Deliberately let some air out of your tires to see what they look like; can you spot a tire with low pressure on the tires that you're using?


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    George - 2013 F6B Standard - Largo, FL

  • #2
    I would say it wasn't there very long as the head of the screw does not show too much wear. Good habit of checking tires regularly, unfortunately I have found similar objects a couple times.

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    • #3
      As ZZCop8 said, probably hasn't been in there very long......head not damaged much. Probably picked it up on your way home from the last ride. Did you plug or replace tire?
      I remember my last one. The tire only had about 5K on it.

      Jim Jackson, Smiths Station, AL
      My Week Has 6-Saturdays and One Sunday. 2012 GW, 2011 H-D
      "We're all travelers in this world. From the sweet grass to the packing house. Birth 'til death. We travel between the eternities"….Prentice Ritter, Broken Trail

      Comment: (For off-topic replies)


      • #4
        That tire had about 8k miles on it. In the 2nd pic in my post, to the upper right of the screw, you can see one of the wear bars. If there was more life left in the tire I would have patched and plugged the tire and put it back on... or maybe tried a mushroom plug... but the rears are so much work that I decided to let it go and get a new tire.

        I've come to realize that changing GL1800 tires (especially the rear) is quite a bit more difficult than many other bikes; the fit of these tires on these rims seems to be much tighter. When you see guys on other bikes demounting the 2nd bead, or mounting the 1st bead, with nothing more than pressing on the tire with no tools... I wonder why our tires are not as easy to change.

        Did Honda deliberately create an exceptionally tight fit due to the weight of the bike?

        George - 2013 F6B Standard - Largo, FL

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        • #5
          Looks like you got screwed.
          John

          Dark Sider 1020
          Michlin Alpin PA3 ZP
          Centramatic Wheel Balancers

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          • #6
            Ha! And not in a good way...

            After this I picked up an emergency repair kit. Those darn screws could sure ruin a good road trip.

            http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ilpage_o06_s00

            George - 2013 F6B Standard - Largo, FL

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            • #7
              Well, at least the tire was nearing its full service life. I think it is the stiffness of the OEM tire sidewalls that make the rear installs more difficult. I've mounted 70 series tires on the GL1800 rear rims and they are much easier. About the only thing tougher than the OEM moto tire is a RF car tire.
              [SIZE=12px][FONT=Arial]--Rob[/FONT][/SIZE]

              [SIZE=12px][FONT=Arial]'10 NT700VA (Wife's)
              '09 Metallic Silver GL18BM-Heli-MMTE[/FONT]
              [FONT=Arial]'89 CB1[/FONT][/SIZE]

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              • #8
                Yeah definitely; I could have gotten some more riding out of it... but not worth it to plug it and put it back on IMO.

                While I was changing this tire I think I discovered the trick; you and others probably know this but it wasn't apparent to me before.

                The trick is to unseat both beads and then use ratchet straps and 2x4 scraps to squeeze the tire and keep both beads in the center well of the rim. Doing this makes getting the bead on the opposite side of the tire quite easy to get on or off the rim. That, and RuGlyde tire lubricant from Napa!
                George - 2013 F6B Standard - Largo, FL

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