High speed blowout fear/risk - real or imagined?

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  • High speed blowout fear/risk - real or imagined?

    So lately when I ride, I have been pondering something I"d love to get some opinions on.

    I generally ride around 70 on the highways (following the speed limits). Occasionally when I'm going long distance such as heading out west from Texas I might gun it a little bit now and then to hurry up and get through the vast stretches of no man's land, just trying to get out of TX I'm running Dunlop Elite E3's, each moderately (middle of age) worn.

    Question .. if my tires are moderately worn (middle aged tires, half way thru useable life) and I've got them properly inflated (I prefer on the higher side, 38 front, 41 rear) - then if I push it up to 100 or even 105 for any period of time - say 15 or 30 mins, in 100* temp, do I have any more of a material "risk" of blowout or other bad things (speeding ticket or road obstacles excluded) happening to me than if I was just humming along at 70? Just wondering if my fear/risk is irrational/imagined or legit. Of course, I realize there's risk any time I step out of my bathtub, etc...

    If anyone has had any experiential stories or what they've heard or seen, appreciate learning of your insights/advice. Would also benefit to know what kind of tires, how much tread wear/life, car tire vs motorcycle tire and any other related factors. Thanks
    --
    2012 Goldwing L2 w/Nav in Dallas, TX

  • #2
    Short answer - imagined. Couple of things to consider. Tread grooves is for water dispersion. If road is dry, tire could be bald - still good to go (think of racing slicks). Tire is rated for whatever speed is stamped on the tire. Which means that it can do that speed indefinitely. Tires are tested in environmental chambers and on desert proving grounds. Only concern you have is that of any motorcycle tire, at any speed. Check daily for delam, bubbles, bad spots, etc.. Me, I run an alternative tire - has greatly reduced the concern factor.

    Comment: (For off-topic replies)


    • #3
      Well ya know anytime you are going faster than normal and something happens it is only quite sure the result will be worse. I think if you check your tires each day and make a habit of that, I mean actually check them, although nothing is a sure thing, the risk is low.

      Never had a blowout on a round bike tire, have seen the results of those who do and it is not pretty. It is my opinion and opinion only that they do get a small puncture or leak and the tire gets hot and hotter from lack of air pressure and blows. Seems to be the formula for disaster learned over the years.

      Now I have played with tires with no air at all in them, and at around 35 to 50 mph a tire with no air in it creates a pretty hard side to side weaving wobble that is hard to control, and I suspect it would be quite the event at faster speeds. More throttle to pick the bike up works better than hitting the brakes.

      This all occurred with experiments during the times of trying out alternative tires. I ran one of them once about 70 miles with no air in it and it got so hot it melted itself to the rim and I had to use steel wool and acetone to clean the rim.

      Conclusion a blow out at 100mph would not be a good thing. But if you just keep an eye on the tires it would be rare. Short bursts of speed do not heat a tire up in any event like sustained high speeds will do.

      But running down the interstate at 80/85 two up and or pulling a trailer and you get a small leak and the tire does become deflated a bit, the heat does build up and that is when you have a problem.

      Sometimes the installer is to blame they tear the bead and the inner air bladder, seal, coating whatever you want to call it and air gets between the inner part of the tire and the outer tread carcass. Seen that be the cause of tire failure also.

      Comment: (For off-topic replies)


      • #4
        Originally posted by ssncob View Post
        Short answer - imagined. Couple of things to consider. Tread grooves is for water dispersion. If road is dry, tire could be bald - still good to go (think of racing slicks). Tire is rated for whatever speed is stamped on the tire. Which means that it can do that speed indefinitely. Tires are tested in environmental chambers and on desert proving grounds. Only concern you have is that of any motorcycle tire, at any speed. Check daily for delam, bubbles, bad spots, etc.. Me, I run an alternative tire - has greatly reduced the concern factor.

        Thanks for that informative answer.

        Btw, what is an "alternative" tire? (what does that mean?)
        --
        2012 Goldwing L2 w/Nav in Dallas, TX

        Comment: (For off-topic replies)


        • crabbywinger
          crabbywinger commented
          Editing a comment
          The alternative tire Jerry speaks of is a car tire. These are not for everyone, but those of us that run them do so for safety reasons firstly and their ability to carry more weight. Check out the darkside part of this forum, there are plenty there who can answer any question you have.

          Crabby Bob

      • #5
        Originally posted by Kit Carson View Post
        Well ya know anytime you are going faster than normal and something happens it is only quite sure the result will be worse. I think if you check your tires each day and make a habit of that, I mean actually check them, although nothing is a sure thing, the risk is low.

        Never had a blowout on a round bike tire, have seen the results of those who do and it is not pretty. It is my opinion and opinion only that they do get a small puncture or leak and the tire gets hot and hotter from lack of air pressure and blows. Seems to be the formula for disaster learned over the years.

        Now I have played with tires with no air at all in them, and at around 35 to 50 mph a tire with no air in it creates a pretty hard side to side weaving wobble that is hard to control, and I suspect it would be quite the event at faster speeds. More throttle to pick the bike up works better than hitting the brakes.

        This all occurred with experiments during the times of trying out alternative tires. I ran one of them once about 70 miles with no air in it and it got so hot it melted itself to the rim and I had to use steel wool and acetone to clean the rim.

        Conclusion a blow out at 100mph would not be a good thing. But if you just keep an eye on the tires it would be rare. Short bursts of speed do not heat a tire up in any event like sustained high speeds will do.

        But running down the interstate at 80/85 two up and or pulling a trailer and you get a small leak and the tire does become deflated a bit, the heat does build up and that is when you have a problem.

        Sometimes the installer is to blame they tear the bead and the inner air bladder, seal, coating whatever you want to call it and air gets between the inner part of the tire and the outer tread carcass. Seen that be the cause of tire failure also.
        Thanks. Quick question on the part where you said "they do get a small puncture or leak" - if I'm going 70 on the highway, the tire cannot spontaneously develop a leak right? it would have to make contact w/ a nail or external object to cause puncture - that scenario I can understand. My fear is more about the tire developing issues without any road stimuli - is that a real concern is what I'm wondering.
        --
        2012 Goldwing L2 w/Nav in Dallas, TX

        Comment: (For off-topic replies)


        • #6
          The Bridgestone tires are rated H, which is 130 MPH. Unless you are exceeding that, and the tire hasn't been repaired, and is properly inflated, I wouldn't expect a problem.
          Costa Mesa, CA
          2012 RED GL1800

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          • #7
            Might I add check the valve stems. I was coming home from a trip last year with a fully loaded bike and trailer on a very hot day. My E3s were at the end of their useful life and I was planning to replace them when I got home. I was traveling about 65mph when the rear end started to wallow out. by the time I got it stopped on the shoulder, the tire was flat. At the time I could not find the cause for the air loss. When I got it home, I swapped the rear wheel with my spare wheel on the shelf and forgot about it.
            Recently I put a new tire on that rim and it would not take air. The tire guy found a cracked valve stem hidden behind the valve support, rubber/plastic 90. All my wheels have metal 90s except that one, but it now does also.
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Ken
            ..........Central California.........'03 1800 Durango red, the fastest color

            "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it".......Mark Twain

            "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their validity."........ Abraham Lincoln

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            • #8
              Originally posted by mrao108 View Post

              Thanks. Quick question on the part where you said "they do get a small puncture or leak" - if I'm going 70 on the highway, the tire cannot spontaneously develop a leak right? it would have to make contact w/ a nail or external object to cause puncture - that scenario I can understand. My fear is more about the tire developing issues without any road stimuli - is that a real concern is what I'm wondering.
              No not exactly, a tire valve stem can leak, or a small leak develop around the rim, many things can happen. This is the reason that Tire Pressure Monitor systems of one form or the other have become so popular.

              There is a lot of trash on the road also and especially if it is raining and the worn tracks are full of water and you are running the center more, lots of nails and screws and stuff like to lay center lane and or along the edge. So you cannot say you will not pick up a puncture as you might at anytime.

              Comment: (For off-topic replies)


              • #9
                Kit brings up a good point. A aftermarket or OEM tire monitoring system is the way to go. Many times things happen slowly, if you have a TPMS (tire pressure montoring system) you are able to see it happening in real time. Catastrophic failure is another matter entirely, and as SSNCOB says that is why we (some of us) run an Alternative tire (see my comment in the post with your question of what he meant). Hope this helps.

                Crabby Bob

                Retired and riding a Goldwing - Life is good!
                2001 Gl1800A - Illusion Red
                DS # 1258 - Double Darkside

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                • #10
                  Thanks, appreciate all the insight. For a while in the summer my TPMS stayed on a lot. Al Lambs Dallas Honda and I suspected perhaps the battery was worn.....said he'll look into it at my next major service at 24k, but when I came in for that, the TPMS had gone off. It's since gone off in general, with no change from me. It still lights up at engine/system boot, but other than that, it seems to be functioning properly.
                  --
                  2012 Goldwing L2 w/Nav in Dallas, TX

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                  • #11
                    As a past Iron Butt Association rider (not so much now) that is of high priority in our style of riding. I was always pushing the tire, bike and my envelope but your tires may be a fatal point to not consider every time you stop, for fuel, for food, for a few minutes of rest or even over-night.. In my case I always run and ran Bias Ply tires front & rear instead of radials that come on your Goldwing as the radials always seem to just give up entirely before you can get stopped where as a Bias Ply tire tends to be more of a leaker and gets soft prior to going down. I always carry my tire repair kit with its cartridge inflator and have used it on one (1) radial ME880 rear before it came apart and (1) Bias MPA front that was still up when I got it stopped. Both inflated and were able to complete the ride. I always check tires when I stop for any reason as tires now a days are subject to any thing on our highways. So Buy the tires for your style of riding, for me they are always Bias Ply and the same brand front and rear, keep them inflated to the correct tire pressure always and check pressure daily, if you stop during the day check your tires (stand the bike up and roll it a few feet forward and back when fueling, even you trike guys..its easier for us) a nail found at the pump may save a long walk down a far away country road where that cell phone won't work!! Be an Eagle Scout and Be Prepared.... Sorry I was long winded... Just my FYI
                    Retired, Lifetime NRA, IBA #5831, AMA Lifer, HOG Lifer, Gypsy Tour Rider

                    "There comes a time in your life, when you walk away from all the drama and people who create it. You surround yourself with people who make you laugh. Forget the bad, and focus on the good. Love the people who treat you right, pray for the ones who don't. Life is too short to be anything but happy. Falling down is a part of life, getting back up is living."

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                    • #12
                      Most blowouts are preventable. Keep your tires properly inflated and don't exceed the load rating and you should be ok unless you hit something to damage the tire.
                      I do recommend a good TPMS too. A little advanced warning goes a long way.

                      Comment: (For off-topic replies)


                      • #13
                        I think the Doran TPMS is one of the best add-on features I have put on my 2012. Being able to see the actual tire pressure while riding makes TPMS worthwhile. The OEM system is junk by comparison.
                        GOLDWING AND F6B MAINTENANCE VIDEOS
                        Save $1000 a year in labor by doing your own maintenance!

                        Website | YouTube | 2001-2017 Videos | 2018+ Videos

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                        • #14
                          Certainly agree..... wish they were cheaper for what they are!
                          Retired, Lifetime NRA, IBA #5831, AMA Lifer, HOG Lifer, Gypsy Tour Rider

                          "There comes a time in your life, when you walk away from all the drama and people who create it. You surround yourself with people who make you laugh. Forget the bad, and focus on the good. Love the people who treat you right, pray for the ones who don't. Life is too short to be anything but happy. Falling down is a part of life, getting back up is living."

                          Comment: (For off-topic replies)


                          • #15
                            Cruiseman did you disable your bikes TPMS and just go with the Doran TPMS or do you use both?

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                            • #16
                              Originally posted by Cruiseman View Post
                              I think the Doran TPMS is one of the best add-on features I have put on my 2012. Being able to see the actual tire pressure while riding makes TPMS worthwhile. The OEM system is junk by comparison.
                              I really don't consider the OEM System junk. just limited.
                              I have my aftermarket TPMS set where the warning light trigger is 5 lbs higher than the trigger point of the OEM. This way the OEM comes on first and if both lights are on, then I know I have a fast leak and need to get off the road. If only the OEM light is on, I can check my pressure with the other system and decide what to do from there.

                              Comment: (For off-topic replies)


                              • #17
                                Originally posted by mrao108 View Post
                                ...If anyone has had any experiential stories or what they've heard or seen, appreciate learning of your insights/advice. Would also benefit to know what kind of tires, how much tread wear/life, car tire vs motorcycle tire and any other related factors. Thanks
                                You don't mention where you are from in your profile but am sure some darksider in your area would be willing to let you try out a CT. I live in Winchester, VA and if you are around here, I'll throw one on your wing so you can try it.
                                Richard
                                Darksider #390
                                Murgie's FAQ

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                                • #18
                                  I think the OEM tpms is a waste,, Idiot lights are aptly named. I run an alternative rear tire because the BEST M/C tire you can buy is horribly over taxed on a loaded wing with two people on it.. I just could not imagine seeing my wife injured because I was too cheap to put the best tire on the bike for pure safety reasons. My last wing had the Alpin on it when WE rode down to wingding in Greenville in pouring rain soakers all the way. The front tire was the only limiting factor on our speed thru the puddles. Now I let the air out of my alpin when I first had it installed 37000 miles earlier and rode it around the neighborhood for about 15 minutes then hit the highway for about a mile. I realized that I would need something that actually worked for a TPMS since the alpin had such a still sidewall. I got the Garmin 590 with tpms. It sets up in minutes and I can change the set points in less than a minute.
                                  Look at the load carrying limits on your E3s and then look at the alpin. I switched out my brand new stock tire on my new CTX at less than 900 miles when my wife said she wanted to go with me to Ocean City.. No alpin to fir it because it is a bigger tire than the wing So I had to go to Bridgestone drive guard run flat

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                                  • #19
                                    Originally posted by mrao108 View Post



                                    Btw, what is an "alternative" tire? (what does that mean?)
                                    I run a BMT R/F (Run Flat).
                                    So I don't have to worry.


                                    ************************************************** *******
                                    You may not like the truth but that don't change it!

                                    When Life hands you a Curve - Lean into it!!.

                                    Maker of the 01-17 GL1800
                                    "Rocky Tree & Comfort Risers".

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                                    • #20
                                      How do you know what pressure to run in a car tire mounted to a bike?
                                      GOLDWING AND F6B MAINTENANCE VIDEOS
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