Am I crazy to buy a Goldwing?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • doc4sleep
    started a topic Am I crazy to buy a Goldwing?

    Am I crazy to buy a Goldwing?

    I used to ride a Suzuki TM 400 and a Honda 750 when I was a young man. Med school, residency, kids, and a new job got in the way and somewhere along the line my motorcycle endorsement lapsed. Every spring I feel the call of the road but this year the desire to ride is stronger than ever. Now that the kids are all grown with kids of their own and I can see the retirement light at the end of the tunnel I am considering another bike.

    I visited one of the local dealers thinking maybe something like a Shadow would be a good "welcome back" bike. I found its size to be underwhelming. I am 63, in great health, 6ft 1in, 220 pounds, lift weights several days a week and still work at a job that requires walking several miles each day. I have taken the written test for my permit and signed up for the local MSF course in a few weeks.

    I would love to ride the 30 minutes to work every day and some weekend rides. My wife says she is not interested in riding with me although when we were younger she used to say if we were going to ride together she wanted her own bike. She's still not crazy about me riding, in fact a few years ago during one of those spring urges she told me to do something safer like learning to fly. I did just that and enjoyed flying for several years.

    Am I crazy to consider buying a used Goldwing (something 2001-present) or should I stick with a smaller bike to get my feet wet?

    I enjoy the expertise of this group. Thanks

  • kwthom
    replied
    Thus, the problem with these sorts of threads...

    A lot of varied experience, and a lot of varied opinions...none of which are necessarily wrong, but everyone has their facts (how they did it...) and opinions (if I had to do it over again...)

    So... doc4sleep ...not sure we've helped the issues, or made it more difficult.

    Leave a comment:


  • clayusmcret
    commented on 's reply
    Pretty much same here minus the motocross. Kids and overseas deployments kept me from riding....until it didn't. All pleasure since.

  • Dlewis2xs
    replied
    When I got back into riding after a 30 year lay I bought a 2000 Valkyrie with 3000 miles on her. At 39000 mile I got an Ultra Clasic, are 36000 miles traded up to a 2007 gl1800. At 104000 miles I traded Big Red in for a 2018 gl1800 dct for my 72 birthday present to myself and just loving it. Do it you won't regret it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ShooterF6B
    commented on 's reply
    Plus one on that

  • CaptLen
    replied
    While I am generally in favor of starting smaller and lighter to gain experience and confidence Info know of a man in our local GWRRA chapter who bought his ‘Wing as a first bike and does fine! I think you’re intelligent and together enough to make a sound decision. You might want to see if you can rent one before you buy

    Leave a comment:


  • JeffP
    replied
    Doc, find yourself a used or new old stock F6B.. Lighter and a bit more agile than the full wing. You won't regret it

    Leave a comment:


  • Rocky
    replied
    Well doc. I see you prescribed the right prescription for yourself already.

    MSF course. https://www.msf-usa.org/
    Then progress through each level. to (Advanced Rider)


    Might as well learn on their beginner machines, until you refresh you skill set. Before buying your own Bike to finish riding larger bike classes.

    Smart way to go about it to see if Riding is what you really want to do again, without laying the cash out up front.


    You are smart to buy an older GL1800 (First)
    NO regrets if you have to leave it parked for whatever reason for a few days/weeks.

    Why spend $25,000+ on a new bike you'll feel obligated to ride?.


    FYI the 2001-2005 bike weighs the same (800lbs) as the smaller new bike (800-849 lbs depending on model)


    I tell returning riders (Treat every ride as a test ride to sharpen your skills.) you never know when skills learned will be called upon to save your hide!


    Enjoy yourself,and be Safe!

    Leave a comment:


  • kwthom
    commented on 's reply
    I'll state that my learning was a lot like those of us here in the deserts or on the left coast in that as a teenager, riding motocross, there really wasn't 'training' as much as there was repetition. Thus, my four years of riding year-round in the deserts and on the tracks did me good when I transitioned immediately into street riding. That street riding was different back then, as you mentioned, but the skills from the dirt transferred well to the street bikes of the era.

    A decade of me as a daily commuter on two wheels was all I could afford at the time. Toward the end, when the unplanned ride termination event happened that led to that 17 year absence from motorcycles, it was a lot less fun to ride. At that point was when I decided that I was getting back into motorcycling solely for pleasure purposes.

  • Buckwing
    replied
    You've laid out a great plan - MSF course first followed by your decision of if you really want to get back in the pool. I think you'll do well in the course since you have some experience. The advice you've received about paying attention to the MSF instructors is spot on. The understanding of motorcycle dynamics is much better now and your instructors will be able to demonstrate/teach you more than you ever learned in your earlier riding days. You'll do fine on a Goldwing - just don't try to challenge your abilities too quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gizmo
    replied
    A Gold Wing is about the least intimidating motorcycle in the world. It starts every time. It requires very little maintenance. The tires tend to last much longer than other bikes. It's easy to clean. It can be ridden in a wide variety of weather. It's comfortable. If you park in a tough spot you can put it in reverse. It's a safe motorcycle. Other Wing owners are friendly, helpful and generous. I could go on and on....
    Buy the Wing!

    Leave a comment:


  • clayusmcret
    replied
    Originally posted by kwthom View Post
    Hehe....

    You'll find this is a BIG group of enablers.

    If I had a do-over, it would be take that MSF class - first - before really doing much of anything besides window shopping.

    Nowhere in the introduction in your post did you make mention of the ability/desire to work on your bike. A good, used bike can be difficult to find, yet they do pop up periodically. Private sale vs. dealer...tough choice.

    So, I was out of motorcycling for 17 years when I jumped back in - no MSF class - on a brand-new Goldwing back in 2007. 120,000 miles and ten years later, I passed it on (sold it) to someone else and bought a 2016 - brand new - as my retirement present.

    Might this one be my last one (I'm in my late 50's)? Can't really say - working hard on wearing this one out.
    CONCUR......FOOT STOMP! TAKE THE MSF CLASS FIRST!

    Now that that's out of the way, seriously, take the class. It's worth it. The way we learned back in the day and what they're teaching now are night and day different....and mostly better.

    I started back after nearly 20 years with a Kawasaki Police Special, then a Shadow 1100, then a 2003 Goldwing and finally a 2008 Goldwing. If you had any skills back in the day and take the class, you can probably get away with going straight to the Goldwing. I would highly recommend something in the 2008-2017 range; quality, age, most issues are known and fairly easily identifiable, etc..

    Ignore all the buttons for the first several months and focus on riding. After that, it'll be old hat.

    Leave a comment:


  • glarson3
    replied
    I think you'll be fine with a Goldwing. Either gen. My wife came off a Shadow, and I had a chance to ride it. It was underwhelming for sure. Practice on the Wing in a parking lot before you start carving the canyons, and you'll be just fine. It's a big bike, but a nimble one, especially for the size. The 2018 is lighter, and smaller, but some are still working the kinks out. Not to say you wouldn't be happy with it though. It took a lot of convincing to get my wife to move to the Wing, but she thanks me constantly for my persistence each time she gets on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • kwthom
    replied
    Originally posted by doc4sleep View Post
    <...>Am I crazy to consider buying a used Goldwing (something 2001-present) or should I stick with a smaller bike to get my feet wet?
    Hehe....

    You'll find this is a BIG group of enablers.

    If I had a do-over, it would be take that MSF class - first - before really doing much of anything besides window shopping.

    Nowhere in the introduction in your post did you make mention of the ability/desire to work on your bike. A good, used bike can be difficult to find, yet they do pop up periodically. Private sale vs. dealer...tough choice.

    So, I was out of motorcycling for 17 years when I jumped back in - no MSF class - on a brand-new Goldwing back in 2007. 120,000 miles and ten years later, I passed it on (sold it) to someone else and bought a 2016 - brand new - as my retirement present.

    Might this one be my last one (I'm in my late 50's)? Can't really say - working hard on wearing this one out.

    Leave a comment:


  • doc4sleep
    replied
    With flying one only has to worry about your own stupid mistakes killing you. I can live with that. With riding one has to worry about all the distracted people around you reading their texts or emails. I actually was behind someone last week who immediately picked up their phone at the stop light and when the light turned green NEVER looked up as he pulled through the intersection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Denman46
    replied
    The new wing is lighter and more maneuverable than earlier models, so if you go Wing, do the new one. And absolutely get a test ride at a dealer. You will be amazed at the bike’s handling. Feels much lighter than it is. If you want to do any touring instead of only around town, don’t go so small. You may decide to trade a year down the road.

    BTW, I remember when flying was dangerous and biking wasn’t. You wife thinks it’s the reverse perhaps.

    Leave a comment:


  • trewm
    replied
    When I got back into riding after a 20 year hiatus I started with a used Honda CB750. You might be able to go straight to a Wing but it's a large, heavy bike with a lot of controls which might be too intimidating. It's also a lot more powerful than your previous bikes. Ultimately only you can determine if it's too much bike for you to start on. I would start by sitting on one at a dealer and just see how the controls are and how heavy it is when you lift it off the sidestand.

    Leave a comment:

Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

Related Topics

Collapse

Working...
X