Obama's air strikes apparently not working

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  • Obama's air strikes apparently not working

    Apparently Obama's strategy for Iraq and Syria is smoke and mirrors and is not working to destroy ISIS or hinder it from capturing territory or towns.

    By Kristina Wong - 10/09/14 05:33 PM EDT
    Officials say U.S.-led airstrikes are not stopping the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) from gaining ground in Iraq and Syria, raising questions as to whether President Obama’s strategy against the terrorist group is working.
    Defense officials have admitted the Kurdish town of Kobani in northern Syria could also fall to ISIS, even as the U.S. has increased airstrikes around the besieged town that is home to as many as 400,000 Kurds.

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    The U.S. has used bombers, fighter jets and drones to conduct at least 37 airstrikes in and around Kobani, but has not succeeded in stopping the group’s advance there since airstrikes began in Syria several weeks ago. "U.S. Central Command continues to monitor the situation in Kobani closely. Indications are that Kurdish militia there continue to control most of the city and are holding out against ISIL," Centcom said in a statement Thursday.
    Pentagon officials also said this week that ISIS is gaining ground in Western Iraq, despite the U.S. and partner nations conducting more than 345 strikes there and dropping more than 1,140 munitions since Aug. 8. This means roughly 5.3 strikes a day.
    The U.S. and partners have conducted more than 124 airstrikes in Syria since Sept. 22. This means roughly 6.5 strikes a day.
    The president emerged from a meeting at the Pentagon with top leaders this week expressing confidence and progress with the strategy, but administration critics pointed to the group’s gains to call for a new military strategy.
    “With two months now of airstrikes, the president's strategy clearly isn't working. ISIL continues to grow, gobble up more territory from Baghdad to Kobani,” House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) said Thursday on Fox News.
    “They keep moving. They get stronger. The president gave a speech a couple months ago of how serious the threat is and how we were going to degrade and destroy them. Well, we're not,” he said.
    Defense officials are urging patience from the American public, saying it is too soon to tell if the strategy — which consists of a handful of targeted airstrikes per day in Iraq and Syria, as well as training indigenous ground forces in Iraq and Syria that won’t be ready for months — is working.
    Some military experts say the strategy is clearly not working, and that the president should dramatically expand airstrikes in Iraq and Syria.
    “You can see that they’re expanding their area of control. ... This is in no way destroying or defeating ISIS. All it’s doing is forcing them to adapt,” said David Kilcullen, counterinsurgency and senior fellow at the left-leaning New America Foundation.
    Kilcullen, who served with the State Department as a senior adviser to retired Gen. David Petraeus in Iraq in 2007, said it would take “months to years” to build capable ground forces in Iraq and Syria, and that U.S. advisers should be able to accompany those forces into battle.
    “In fact, without some kind of significant ground force, an air campaign alone is actually going to improve the enemy’s quality by killing the stupid and unlucky ones and bringing more talented and savvy guys to the fore,” he said.
    "We need to be cautious about ascribing too much value to committing airpower and airstrikes to this campaign," said retired Army Lt. Gen. Dave Barno, a senior fellow at the left-leaning Center for a New American Security in a recent interview with The Hill.
    "Ultimately, it's going to be Iraqi boots on the ground, Peshmerga boots on the ground, Syrian boots on the ground supported by American airpower that turns it around," he added.
    The Pentagon said Wednesday it was still in the “very early stages” of the training moderate Syrian rebels, and that vetting and recruiting fighters have not started yet.
    Administration officials have vowed not to send U.S. troops back into combat in Iraq, or to Syria, but experts say expanding the mission of the 1,600 U.S. troops ordered there could be necessary.
    “You really need to also have advisers that are able to accompany the ground forces that they are assisting,” Kilcullen said.
    http://thehill.com/policy/defense/22...-stopping-isis



    "I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for few public officials." (George Mason, 3 Elliot, Debates at 425-426)

  • #2
    Oh say it ain't so that Obama's White House lied to the American people about having knowledge or connection to the Secret Service scandal.

    Read the article.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/politi...=%3Ftid%3Dsm_t
    "I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for few public officials." (George Mason, 3 Elliot, Debates at 425-426)

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    • #3
      It wasn't meant to work. It was only meant to get the press off his back through the mid-terms.
      2008 Red GW1800 -- NRA Life Member - American Legion PUFL, American Legion Riders
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      • #4
        Obama's foreign policy legacy will be Iran getting a nuclear weapon, which will mean the ultimate destruction of Israel. Obama is the most successful President in my lifetime. He did EXACTLY what he said he would do. He fundamentally transformed America. We are weak militarily, disrespected around the world, the economy is on a knife edge, unemployment is higher than at any point in my lifetime, inflation is through the roof (yeah, I know, there is no inflation. Go buy a jar of peanut butter and get back to me on that). For the only time in history, you cannot make ANY money by saving money. I think even in 1890 you could get 5% on a savings account.

        Obama will also be the first billionaire ex-President. He will get $250,000 to $500,000 per gig for speaking fees.
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        • #5
          Of course it's not working.

          He forgot to bow.
          2012 Honda Goldwing | 2009 Timeout Camper



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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cruiseman View Post
            Obama's foreign policy legacy will be Iran getting a nuclear weapon, which will mean the ultimate destruction of Israel. Obama is the most successful President in my lifetime. He did EXACTLY what he said he would do. He fundamentally transformed America. We are weak militarily, disrespected around the world, the economy is on a knife edge, unemployment is higher than at any point in my lifetime, inflation is through the roof (yeah, I know, there is no inflation. Go buy a jar of peanut butter and get back to me on that). For the only time in history, you cannot make ANY money by saving money. I think even in 1890 you could get 5% on a savings account.

            Obama will also be the first billionaire ex-President. He will get $250,000 to $500,000 per gig for speaking fees.
            Unfortunately the option was to vote for Willard R. who believes in "magical' underwear, and a mystical planet.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pearlblue1800 View Post

              Unfortunately the option was to vote for Willard R. who believes in "magical' underwear, and a mystical planet.
              Yeah congrats on Canada coming over to bomb ISIS. Now Canada is sucked back in. Well maybe at least the Canadians might fly more missions.
              "I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for few public officials." (George Mason, 3 Elliot, Debates at 425-426)

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              • #8
                Well heck, being from the office of the Organizer in Chief, they planned the event for the boys.
                Richard
                Darksider #390
                Murgie's FAQ

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                • #9
                  Air campaigns are useless unless backed by ground forces. This has been proven time and time again. And the thought of using just 1600 troops is suicidal lunacy. In most cases you want a 5 to 1 ratio to conduct a overwhelming offensive and lower the risks to your own troops. What the air campaign can do is cut off some of the money by destroying revenue generating oil infrastructure, but there are plenty of other sources to fund ISIS.

                  Remember the old saying "War is merely the continuation of politics by other means" Carl von Clausewitz.

                  So I am not at all surprised by this approach nor by the media's general lack of criticism. The media has the knowledge and understanding of force objectives and the need for real-time intelligence to easily understand that this is a pitiful attempt to placate us. The only good news here, and no its not good news, is that ISIS is gaining ground so fast that even the media must take notice. At least a little.

                  Is there a solution? Can ISIS (and other violent radical groups) be destroyed? The answer is yes, but the probability is very low as Islam will need to police itself. Until it's in Islam's best interest to moderate as a whole, it will not happen. And that is another entire conversation.

                  ...gene
                  2012 GL1800 NAVI, GWRRA 367875
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                  • #10
                    No-fly zone in Syria difficult

                    "
                    A Billion Dollars per month"
                    by The Canadian Press | Story: 124645 - Oct 11, 2014 / 8:34 pm





                    Photo: The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.
                    Mourners gather for the funeral of two Syrian Kurdish fighters, names not available, killed in the fighting with the militants of the Islamic State group in Kobani, Syria, at a cemetery in Suruc, on the Turkey-Syria border, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)


                    The Obama administration's promise to limit U.S. military engagement against Islamic State militants makes it difficult to accept Turkey's terms for joining the fight in neighbouring Syria.
                    Turkey and other American allies want the U.S. to create a no-fly zone inside Syrian territory. Yet doing that would mean embracing one of two options President Barack Obama long has resisted: co-operating with Syrian President Bashar Assad's government or taking out its air defences, an action tantamount to war.
                    There are increasing demands for the creation of a secure buffer on the Syrian side of the border with Turkey.
                    The U.S. and others in the coalition fighting the militants are pleading with Turkey, a NATO ally, to prevent the fall of Kobani, a border town where the United Nations is warning of mass casualties.
                    A "safe zone" would require Americans and their partners to protect ground territory and patrol the sky, meaning enforcement of a no-fly area.
                    For Turkey, a buffer might stem the flow of refugees and could give Syrian opposition fighters a staging ground for their drive to oust Assad, an Ankara aim.
                    The U.S. wants to keep the focus on combating Islamic State militants who have captured large areas of northern Syria and Iraq.
                    Some of America's closest partners and Obama's fiercest foreign policy critics are sympathetic to Turkey's request.
                    France came out in support this past week. The Republican leader of the House Foreign Affairs Committee believes Arab countries would shoulder the load. Even Secretary of State John Kerry says a no-fly zone is worth examining.
                    Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel has shown little enthusiasm, saying American leaders are open to discussing a safe zone, but creating one isn't "actively being considered."
                    For the U.S. military, there are red flags about establishing an area in Syria safe from attacks by the Islamic State group and Syria's air force.
                    Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has estimated it would require hundreds of U.S. aircraft and cost as much as $1 billion a month to maintain, with no assurance of a change in battlefield momentum toward ending the Syrian civil war.
                    That means U.S. enforcement could become open-ended.
                    The Pentagon learned that lesson in Iraq, when in 1991 in the aftermath of the Gulf War, it established a no-fly zone over northern Iraq to protect Iraqi Kurds and another protective zone over southern Iraq to protect Shiites. Those zones were enforced by U.S. Air Force and Navy pilots for a dozen years, until the March 2003 invasion of Iraq.
                    A zone in Syria would set the stage for a direct confrontation with one of the Mideast's most formidable air defences, a system bolstered in recent years by top-of-the-line Russian hardware.
                    The Syrians possess multiple surface-to-air missiles providing overlapping coverage and thousands of anti-aircraft guns capable of engaging attacking aircraft at lower levels.
                    Moscow infuriated Washington last year when it confirmed that it would sell to Syria its S-300 anti-aircraft missiles, considered to be the cutting edge in aircraft interception technology.
                    The political challenges of a no-fly zone may prove even greater.
                    Given the threat to U.S. pilots, the Pentagon would need rescue personnel stationed nearby, perhaps in Turkey or Iraq. If a plane were downed, American troops then would have to hit the ground in Syria, which Obama repeatedly has ruled out.
                    Direct military action against Assad's government also would stretch the United States' already tenuous claims that intervening in Syria is legal under U.S. and international law.
                    Many members of Congress are challenging Obama's justification for war on the basis of the Bush administration's 2001 authorization to fight al-Qaida. The Islamic State group grew from the al-Qaida movement, but the two now are enemies. The U.S. has no U.N. mandate to wage war in Syria.
                    The U.S. could try for an accommodation with Assad. But even if Syrian forces are similarly battling the Islamic State militants, Obama has ruled that out because of alleged human rights violations and war crimes by those forces. Western governments and human rights groups cite massacres of civilians and opposition forces and chemical weapons attacks by Assad's troops.
                    Washington is searching for an alternative approach with Turkey.
                    On Friday, retired Marine Gen. John Allen, the U.S. special envoy, and his State Department deputy Brett McGurk met in Ankara with Turkish officials and NATO's secretary-general. More U.S.-Turkey talks were set for this coming week.
                    Turkey says it will support efforts to train and equip the Syrian opposition. A senior U.S. official confirmed Saturday that Turkey has agreed to train the Syrian moderates inside Turkey. The official was not authorized to discuss the negotiations publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.
                    Kerry, who was heading to a conference in Cairo on Gaza reconstruction this weekend, was expected to discuss the effort against the Islamic State group with officials from Arab countries that are pressing for more robust American action

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                    • #11
                      Has ANYTHING the Obama administration done been successful?

                      Oh yeah, there have been many successful scandal's he has avoided over the past 6 years. The scandals are now in the double digits!

                      And he has had many successful vacations, golf outings, and fund raising dinners attended.

                      What is sad is that in the future; history will show just how bad Obama is as a president (no matter what political side your on) and poorly he did his job. And being the first half black president, I fear it will reflect negatively on black people, when his poor leadership was due to no experience and the 'holier than thou attitude' and not race.
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