For all you Dads

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  • For all you Dads

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  • #2
    Good one. My kids are finding out that the old man isn't as weird as they thought. Surprisingly though the old man still gets advice on things from the kids, who are way smarter on some things than the old man. Miss my dad a lot, but the memories are still with me and I appreciate all the good times with both of my folks. Take care.

    Crabby Bob

    Retired and riding a Goldwing - Life is good!
    2001 Gl1800A - Illusion Red
    DS # 1258 - Double Darkside

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    • #3
      Now that my kids are 26, 24, and 22 years old, I get a kick out of watching them say and do some of the same things that they used to roll their eyes at me for when I said/did them. Lost both of my parents within a 6 month stretch this year and, although I'm only 51 yrs old, the last item on the list rings true for sure.
      Ron
      2002 GL1800A Darksider #1312
      Experience is the hardest teacher because she gives the test first,
      and the lesson afterward ~ Vernon Sanders Law

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      • #4
        My Dad passed away in 1986 at the age of 65 years 5 months and 8 days. I just reached that age a month ago. I sure miss my Dad.
        2012 Goldwing CSC Viper Trike
        Retired MSF Instructor

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        • #5
          Originally posted by WB-Ron View Post
          Now that my kids are 26, 24, and 22 years old, I get a kick out of watching them say and do some of the same things that they used to roll their eyes at me for when I said/did them. Lost both of my parents within a 6 month stretch this year and, although I'm only 51 yrs old, the last item on the list rings true for sure.
          That made me smile. When my youngest daughter was about 6, there was an incident where she called me a name and didn't know what it meant. I really didn't chew her out, just shocked her a little by explaining to her what that word meant, and that she shouldn't call people that. It has long been one of our favorite "family stories."

          Fast forward 23 years, and Katie is 29 now, with 2 kids of her own. We were all on a campout, and my wife I joined them after their first night. Apparently, they had been raided the night before by raccoons. The evening that my wife and I joined them, I saw one of the little guys sneaking up a tree, and called my grandson over to see it. He got very animated and said "You!!!! You took our food!!!! You baster!!!!!"

          I tried not to laugh, and explained to him (much like I had his mother) that it's a bad word he shouldn't be using, and that he got the word wrong anyway. However; apparently that wasn't his first foray into the world of "grown up words", and his mom really lit into him.

          I walked away far enough that I hoped he couldn't see me, and couldn't help laughing as I watched her and the memories came flooding back.

          Every now and then she stopped long enough to glare at me with this "quit laughing at me" look, but I could pretty clearly see she was fighting back the smiles herself.
          2012 Honda Goldwing | 2009 Timeout Camper



          Patriot Guard Rider since 2007 | IBA member #59823

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          • #6
            I see thru my kids (daughter and sons) some of what I taught them when they were younger come out and mom says that they are just like me. Life is too short when it comes to family members. Be nice to each other. And say I love you, those three words mean a lot when someone gets older, nice to know you are not forgotten.
            "I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for few public officials." (George Mason, 3 Elliot, Debates at 425-426)

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